Effect of silvicultural practice and wood type on loblolly pine particleboard and medium density fiberboard properties

  • Authors: Shupe, Todd F.; Hse, Chung Y.; Choong, Elvin T.; Groom, Leslie H..
  • Publication Year: 1999
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Holzforschung.53(2):215-222.

Abstract

he objective of this study was to determine the effect of five different silvicultural strategies and wood type on mechanical and physical properties of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) particleboard and fiberboard. The furnish was prepared in an unconventional manner from innerwood and outerwood veneer for each stand. Modulus of rupture (MOR) differences between the stands were insignificant for particleboard. Some significant modulus of elasticity (MOE) differences existed between the stands for particleboard and fiberboard. Differences between the wood types were minimal for each stand. Innerwood yielded higher mean MOR, MOE, and internal bond (IB) values than outerwood for most of the stands. The differences between the stand and wood types for 2 and 24 h thickness swell and 2 and 24h water adsorption were very minimal. This research has shown that innerwood can produce particleboard and fiberboard panels with very comparable mechanical and physical properties to outerwood. The effect of the silvicultural strategy (i.e., stand) was minimal for most properties.

  • Citation: Shupe, Todd F.; Hse, Chung Y.; Choong, Elvin T.; Groom, Leslie H.. 1999. Effect of silvicultural practice and wood type on loblolly pine particleboard and medium density fiberboard properties. Holzforschung.53(2):215-222.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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