The efficacy of using inventory data to develop optimal diameter increment models

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  • Authors: Bragg, Don C.
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: McRoberts, Ronald E.; Reams, Gregory A.; Van Deusen, Paul C.; Moser, John W., eds. Proceedings of the Thrid Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-230. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 121-129

Abstract

Most optimal tree diameter growth models have arisen through either the conceptualization of physiological processes or the adaptation of empirical increment models. However, surprisingly little effort has been invested in the melding of these approaches even though it is possible to develop theoretically sound, computationally efficient optimal tree growth models using inventory data. The Potential Relative Increment (PRI) methodology is a good example of a flexible potential growth modeling system developed under these auspices. I present a series of suggestions for ecological consistency, variable and parameter assumptions, statistical properties, data quality, and model flexibility that should be considered when developing optimal increment models, exemplified with white oak (Quercus alba L.) equations from the Midsouth region.

  • Citation: Bragg, Don C. 2002. The efficacy of using inventory data to develop optimal diameter increment models. In: McRoberts, Ronald E.; Reams, Gregory A.; Van Deusen, Paul C.; Moser, John W., eds. Proceedings of the Thrid Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-230. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 121-129
  • Posted Date: May 25, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 11, 2006
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