Oleoresin Capsicum has Potential as a Rodent Repellent in Direct Sedding Longleaf Pine

  • Authors: Barnett, James P.
  • Publication Year: 1998
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Proceedings of the Ninth Biennial Southern Silvilcultural Reaserch Conference

Abstract

Direct seeding of southern pines has been a versatile and inexpensive alternative to planting on many reforestation sites across the South. Successful direct seeding has required that seeds be coated with thiram to repel birds, and with endrin to repel rodents. Endrin, which is extremely toxic, is no longer produced in the United States. Therefore, a substitute is needed. Oleoresin capsicum, a natural substance derived from pepper plants, has potential as a repellent. It occurs in an extremely concentrated form, and its repellency is caused by the heat of the capsicum. Preliminary tests have shown that at low rates oleoresin capsicum had little effect on the germination of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seeds, and significantly reduced losses from predation.

  • Citation: Barnett, James P. 1998. Oleoresin Capsicum has Potential as a Rodent Repellent in Direct Sedding Longleaf Pine. Proceedings of the Ninth Biennial Southern Silvilcultural Reaserch Conference
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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