Forest statistics for Central Florida - 1995

  • Authors: Brown, Mark J.
  • Publication Year: 1996
  • Publication Series: Resource Bulletin (RB)
  • Source: Resour. Bull. SRS–2. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 56 p.
  • DOI: 10.2737/SRS-RB-2

Abstract

This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of Central Florida. Field work began in February 1995 and was completed in May 1995. Six previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1949, 1959, 1970, 1960, and 1988 provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 59 years. This report primarily emphasizes the changes and trends since 1988. Periodic surveys of forest resources are authorized by the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Research Act of 1978. These surveys are a continuing, nationwide undertaking by the Regional Experiment Stations of the USDA Forest Service. In the Southern United States, these surveys are conducted by two Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Research Work Units at the Southern Research Station, Asheville, NC. The two FIA units, one located in Starkville, MS, and the other in Asheville, NC, are responsible for inventories of 13 Southern States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The primary objective of these surveys is to periodically inventory and evaluate all forest and related resources. These multiresource data help provide a basis for formulating forest policies end programs and for the orderly development and use of the resources. This report deals only with the extent and condition of forest land, associated timber volumes, and rates of timber growth, mortality, and removals.

  • Citation: Brown, Mark J. 1996. Forest statistics for Central Florida - 1995. Resour. Bull. SRS–2. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 56 p.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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