Relationship between atmospheric stability and area burned during the 1998 Florida wildfires

  • Authors: Goodrick, Scott L.
  • Publication Year: 2003
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Second International wildland Fire Ecology And Fire Management Congress And Fifth Symposium On Fire And Forest Meteorology, November 16-20, Orlando, Florida, p. 1-5

Abstract

During the spring and early summer of 1998, over 2,200 wildfires scorched nearly a half million acres of Florida. Many of these fires rapidly grew to large sizes and threatened and/or damaged private homes (126 were lost). During this period, a strong ridge of high pressure developed over the region and persisted from late April through the first week of July. High temperature records were continuously being set across Florida during the month of June, presenting severe fire weather conditions as these high temperatures contributed to unusually low relative humidity. While these conditions persisted throughout the event, certain days exhibited very dramatic fire growth/activity that is likely tied to atmospheric stability.

  • Citation: Goodrick, Scott L. 2003. Relationship between atmospheric stability and area burned during the 1998 Florida wildfires. In: Second International wildland Fire Ecology And Fire Management Congress And Fifth Symposium On Fire And Forest Meteorology, November 16-20, Orlando, Florida, p. 1-5
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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