Interactions of forest management practices and tip moth damage

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  • Authors: Nowak, John T.
  • Publication Year: 1999
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings Of An Informal Conference The Entomological Society of Americal, Annual Meeting, December 12-16, Atlanta, Georgia, Eds. Berisford, C. Wayne; Grosman, Donald M., p. 20-25

Abstract

Intensive forest management practices have been shown to increase tree growth and shorten rotation time. However, they may also increase the need for insect pest management because of higher infestation levels and lower action thresholds. The Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana [Comstock]) is one insect that is expected to become more important with more intensive forest management practices. Two studies were developed to investigate these relationships. Treatments included various combinations of herbicide applications, irrigation, fertilization, and insecticide applications. These studies demonstrated that tip moth management improves tree growth. Tip moth damage increased due to weed control, but not due to N fertilization. Nitrogen fertilization did increase the number of tip moth pupae per shoot, however. In conclusion tip moth populations can increase due to intensive management practices, and insect control should be considered a part of efforts to maximize tree growth.

  • Citation: Nowak, John T. 1999. Interactions of forest management practices and tip moth damage. In: Proceedings Of An Informal Conference The Entomological Society of Americal, Annual Meeting, December 12-16, Atlanta, Georgia, Eds. Berisford, C. Wayne; Grosman, Donald M., p. 20-25
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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