Globe, student inquiry, and learning communities

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  • Authors: Henzel, C.L.
  • Publication Year: 2000
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of a Conference on Sustainability of Wetlands and Water Resources, May 23-25, Oxford, Mississippi, eds. Holland, Marjorie M.; Warren, Melvin L.; Stanturf, John A., p. 109-111

Abstract

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) database is a web-based archive of environmental data gathered by K through 12 students in over 85 countries. The data are gathered under protocols developed by research scientists specializing in various fields of earth science. Students gather information, then enter and visualize the data via the Internet. GLOBE’s potential is to provide two major components that affect sustainability and conservation: quality earth system data and science education opportunities for students. First, GLOBE maintains a quality, accessible database of millions of environmental data at a geographic scale never before attempted. Second, GLOBE is a real opportunity for students to learn field study and scientific research methods. GLOBE provides easy access to data and visualization tools via the Internet to help teachers and students understand, interpret, and ask relevant questions about the earth system. Students who have a greater understanding of how the environmental system in their community operates can make more informed decisions on sustainability and conservation issues on a larger scale.

  • Citation: Henzel, C.L. 2000. Globe, student inquiry, and learning communities. In: Proceedings of a Conference on Sustainability of Wetlands and Water Resources, May 23-25, Oxford, Mississippi, eds. Holland, Marjorie M.; Warren, Melvin L.; Stanturf, John A., p. 109-111
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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