Effects of soil oxidation-reduction conditions on internal oxygen transport, root aeration, and growth of wetland plants

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  • Authors: Pezeshki, S.R.; DeLaune, R.D.
  • Publication Year: 2000
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of a Conference on Sustainability of Wetlands and Water Resources, May 23-25, Oxford, Mississippi, eds. Holland, Marjorie M.; Warren, Melvin L.; Stanturf, John A., p. 139-145

Abstract

Characterization of hydric soils and the relationship between soil oxidation-reduction processes and wetland plant distribution are critical to the identification and delineation of wetlands and to our understanding of soil processes and plant functioning in wetland ecosystems. However, the information on the relationship between flood response of wetland plants and reducing soil conditions is limited. We have examined the influence of intensity and capacity of soil reduction on internal oxygen transport, rhizosphere oxygenation, nutrient uptake, root and shoot growth, and survival of several wetland species. Whereas the study species displayed a wide range of responses, intense soil reduction below -200 mV adversely affected growth and biomass accumulation in the majority of these species. It is clear that high oxygen demand in soil resulting from intense reduction influences oxygen transport and release to the rhizosphere. In addition, root elongation and shoot growth are profoundly influenced by the intensity and capacity of soil reduction.

  • Citation: Pezeshki, S.R.; DeLaune, R.D. 2000. Effects of soil oxidation-reduction conditions on internal oxygen transport, root aeration, and growth of wetland plants. In: Proceedings of a Conference on Sustainability of Wetlands and Water Resources, May 23-25, Oxford, Mississippi, eds. Holland, Marjorie M.; Warren, Melvin L.; Stanturf, John A., p. 139-145
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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