Riverbank restoration in the southern United States: The effects of soil texture and moisture regime on survival and growth of willow posts

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  • Authors: Pezeshki, S. Reza; Schaff, Steven D.; Shields, F. Douglas
  • Publication Year: 2000
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of a Conference on Sustainability of Wetlands and Water Resources, May 23-25, Oxford, Mississippi, eds. Holland, Marjorie M.; Warren, Melvin L.; Stanturf, John A., p. 146-152

Abstract

Field studies were conducted to quantify the relationship between soil conditions and growth of black willow posts planted for riverbank erosion control along Harland Creek (HC) and Twentymile Creek (TC) sites in Mississippi. Both sites had a wide range of soil texture and moisture regimes. Soil texture, water level, redox potential (Eh), and willow survival and growth were monitored. At the HC site, growth was lower in posts located at elevational extremes than for posts planted approximately 0.5 m above creek elevation at baseflow. Optimum conditions for growth were provided at moderate elevations characterized by groundwater levels that fluctuated around 50 cm beneath the soil surface. Data from the TC site also indicated a close correlation between soil texture, moisture, and survival of willows. Posts grown in silty-clay soils displayed low survival and growth in comparison to those grown in sandy soils. Locations along the creek characterized by sandy soils, adequate soil moisture, and well-drained conditions resulted in high survival and growth.

  • Citation: Pezeshki, S. Reza; Schaff, Steven D.; Shields, F. Douglas, Jr. 2000. Riverbank restoration in the southern United States: The effects of soil texture and moisture regime on survival and growth of willow posts. In: Proceedings of a Conference on Sustainability of Wetlands and Water Resources, May 23-25, Oxford, Mississippi, eds. Holland, Marjorie M.; Warren, Melvin L.; Stanturf, John A., p. 146-152
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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