Development of a short-term (<12 days), plant-based screening method to assess the bioavailability, bioconcentration, and phytotoxicity of Hexahydro-1,3,5- Trinitro-1,3,5-Tiazine (RDZ) to terrestrial plants

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  • Authors: Winfield, Linda; D''Surney, Steven; Rodgers, John
  • Publication Year: 2000
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of a Conference on Sustainability of Wetlands and Water Resources, May 23-25, Oxford, Mississippi, eds. Holland, Marjorie M.; Warren, Melvin L.; Stanturf, John A., p. 190

Abstract

Limited amounts of information have been published on the environmental impacts of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) to terrestrial plant communities. RDX is one of the two high-explosive compounds used by the U.S. military (Davis 1998) and classified as a priority pollutant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Millions of acres of land on military installations, as well as manufacturing, storage, and disposal sites, have been contaminated with RDX (Jenkins 1989). Therefore, environmental risk assessments (ERAs) are conducted to determine the potential environmental impacts of RDX on receptors. Research on the environmental impacts of RDX on terrestrial plants is needed to facilitate filling data gaps and decrease the level of uncertainty and costs associated with ERAs on RDX.

  • Citation: Winfield, Linda; D''Surney, Steven; Rodgers, John 2000. Development of a short-term (<12 days), plant-based screening method to assess the bioavailability, bioconcentration, and phytotoxicity of Hexahydro-1,3,5- Trinitro-1,3,5-Tiazine (RDZ) to terrestrial plants. In: Proceedings of a Conference on Sustainability of Wetlands and Water Resources, May 23-25, Oxford, Mississippi, eds. Holland, Marjorie M.; Warren, Melvin L.; Stanturf, John A., p. 190
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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