Mechanical properties of small-scale wood laminated composite poles

  • Authors: Piao, Cheng; Shupe, Todd F.; Hse, Chung Y.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Journal of the Society of wood science and technology, Volume 36(4), October 2004, 536-544

Abstract

Power companies in the United States consume millions of solid wood poles every year. These poles are from high-valued trees that are becoming more expensive and less available. wood laminated composite poles (LCP) are a novel alternative to solid wood poles. LCP consists of trapezoid wood strips that are bonded by a synthetic resin. The wood strips can be made from low-valued wood and residues. This study evaluated the mechanical performance of small-scale LCP as affected by strip thickness and number of strips in a pole. The maximum bending stress of composite poles was comparable to that of solid poles of the same sizes. Thicker wood strips lead to stronger glue-line shear but poorer crushing stress. Number of strips in a pole was positively correlated to modulus of elasticity (MOE) and shear stress but negatively correlated to crushing stress. The results suggest that LCP with shell thickness greater than 50% of its diameter could be possible substitute for solid wood poles. Thinner shells can be used by filling partially or totally the hallow core with other materials such as processing wastes.

  • Citation: Piao, Cheng; Shupe, Todd F.; Hse, Chung Y. 2004. Mechanical properties of small-scale wood laminated composite poles. Journal of the Society of wood science and technology, Volume 36(4), October 2004, 536-544
  • Keywords: composite poles, wood composites, LCP, shear strength, crushing strength, utility poles
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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