Economics of Afforestation with Eastern Cottonwood (Populus Deltoides) of Agricultural Land in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley

  • Authors: Stanturf, John A.; Portwood, C. Jeffrey
  • Publication Year: 1999
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Paper presented at the Tenth Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference, Shreveport, LA, February 18-18, 1999

Abstract

Higher prices for hardwood stumpage and changes in agricultural policies may favor afforestation on sites in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV) which are suitable for Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.). We examined the potential returns to a landowner growing cottonwood on three soil classes common to the LMAV. We specified the conditions under which we think such afforestation projects will be successful. Afforestation with cottonwood was a profitable investment under most conditions. Including federal cost-share, available under the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), greatly increased profitability. Landowners interested in establishing oak-dominated forests can offset costs by interplanting cottonwood and red oak. Long-term management for cottonwood pulpwood can be profitable if coppice is included. On lower productivity sites, coppice is probably necessary.

  • Citation: Stanturf, John A.; Portwood, C. Jeffrey 1999. Economics of Afforestation with Eastern Cottonwood (Populus Deltoides) of Agricultural Land in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Paper presented at the Tenth Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference, Shreveport, LA, February 18-18, 1999
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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