Response of timber growth and avian communities to quality vegetation management in mid-rotation crp pine plantations

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Sladek, Brandon G.; Munn, Ian A.; Burder, L. Wes; Roberts, Scott D.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 30-33

Abstract

Provisions of the 2002 Farm Bill gave Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) participants greater flexibility to implement mid-contract management activities that encourage wildlife habitat improvement and timber production. Quality Vegetation Management (QVM) is one such technique that utilizes the selective herbicide Imazapyr and prescribed burning. Timber growth (d.b.h., total/merchantable heights, and cubic foot volume per acre) and summer avian community responses (relative abundance, species richness, and total conservation value) to the QVM treatment are being evaluated in mid-rotation CRP loblolly pine plantations in two physiographic regions of Mississippi. By 2-years post-treatment, significant increases in the relative abundance of six early successional bird species were detected on treated sites. Although not significant, mean pine growth increment increases were slightly greater on treated plots than on control plots.

  • Citation: Sladek, Brandon G.; Munn, Ian A.; Burder, L. Wes; Roberts, Scott D. 2006. Response of timber growth and avian communities to quality vegetation management in mid-rotation crp pine plantations. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 30-33
  • Posted Date: June 13, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.