Current knowledge on effects of forest silvicultural operations on carbon sequestration in southern forests

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  • Authors: Cason, John D.; Grebner, Donald L.; Londo, Andrew J.; Grado, Stephen C.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 57-60

Abstract

Incentive programs to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are increasing in number with the growing threat of global warming. Terrestrial sequestration of CO2 through forestry practices on newly established forests is a potential mitigation tool for developing carbon markets in the United States. The extent of industrial and non-industrial private timberland in parts of the southeastern United States is increasing rapidly with the reforestation of marginal or abandoned croplands. The afforestation or reforestation potential of Mississippi and the rest of the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley may play a significant role in the creation of new sequestration forests in Mississippi. This study reviews research pertaining to the effects of various forest management practices on the above- and below-ground carbon fluxes of southern forests.

  • Citation: Cason, John D.; Grebner, Donald L.; Londo, Andrew J.; Grado, Stephen C. 2006. Current knowledge on effects of forest silvicultural operations on carbon sequestration in southern forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 57-60
  • Posted Date: June 13, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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