Separating live from dead longleaf pine seeds: good and bad news

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Barnett, James P.; Dumroese, R. Kasten
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 81-84

Abstract

Of all southern pine seeds, longleaf pine (Pinus palutris Mill.) are the most difficult to collect, process, treat, and store while maintaining good seed quality. As a result, interest in techniques for separating filled dead from live longleaf pine seeds has developed. The good news is that new technologies are becoming available to evaluate seed quality, but the bad news is that they seem to have limited application to longleaf pine. Tests suggest that incubating, drying, and separating, chlorophyll fluorescence, and near infrared techniques do not help improve longleaf pine seed quality. The incubating-drying-separating method is inefficacious because variability in the seed coat wing stub affects seed flotation. The chlorophyll fluorescence method measures changes in chlorophyll content as seeds mature or are damaged, but such changes do not seem to occur in pine seeds. The near infrared method seems to offer the best potential. The use of near infrared scanning technologies can determine changes in seed constituents, but we have not been able to determine which measurable seed constituents may change as viability declines.

  • Citation: Barnett, James P.; Dumroese, R. Kasten 2006. Separating live from dead longleaf pine seeds: good and bad news. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 81-84
  • Posted Date: June 15, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Requesting Print Publications

    Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

    Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.