Analysis of seasonal, diurnal, and noctural growth patterns of young longleaf pine

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  • Authors: Gilbert, John C.; Meldahl, Ralph S.; Kush, John S.; Boyer, William D.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 92-94

Abstract

Forty longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) trees initially ranging from 1 to 1.5 m in height were measured on the Escambia Experimental Forest from 1969 through 1980. The trees were evenly divided between two soil types. From 1969 through 1970, height and diameter measurements were recorded one to four times weekly during the growing seasons and once a month during the dormant seasons. Daily height growth measurements were recorded in the morning and again in the evening during the peaks of these two growing seasons to determine diurnal and nocturnal growth. Follow-up height and diameter measurements were recorded periodically from 1971 through 1980. To test the effects shading had on growth patterns, cheesecloth was suspended over 10 randomly selected trees from each soil type during the first growing season. Analyses of variance were used to identify potentially significant differences in growth between shade treatments and soil types.

  • Citation: Gilbert, John C.; Meldahl, Ralph S.; Kush, John S.; Boyer, William D. 2006. Analysis of seasonal, diurnal, and noctural growth patterns of young longleaf pine. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 92-94
  • Posted Date: June 15, 2006
  • Modified Date: November 12, 2020
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