Western gulf culture-density study-early results

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  • Authors: Rahman, Mohd S.; Messina, Michael G.; Fisher, Richard F.; Wilson, Alan B.; Chappell, Nick; Fristoe, Conner; Anderson, Larry
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 180-184

Abstract

The Western Gulf Culture-Density Study is a collaborative research effort between Texas A&M University and five forest products companies to examine the effects of early silvicultural treatment intensity and a wide range of both densities and soil types on performance of loblolly pine. The study tests 2 silvicultural intensities, 5 planting densities (200 to 1,200 trees per acre), and 4 soil types classified by drainage class and depth to a restrictive layer. Eighteen sites were established between 2001 and 2003 in four states. The final product of this research will be an estimate of the best combination of early silvicultural practices for a given soil type and location and the production of data for growth and yield modeling of loblolly pine stands in the West Gulf. This paper presents current survival and growth data for the study sites and discusses trends in response to density, culture, and soil type.

  • Citation: Rahman, Mohd S.; Messina, Michael G.; Fisher, Richard F.; Wilson, Alan B.; Chappell, Nick; Fristoe, Conner; Anderson, Larry. 2006. Western gulf culture-density study-early results. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 180-184
  • Posted Date: June 16, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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