Eighteen-year response of slash pine to wet-weather harvesting and site preparation on a poorly drained silt loam soil in Louisiana

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  • Authors: Scott, D. Andrew; Tiarks, Allan E.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 185-190

Abstract

Physical disturbances to soil resulting from forest management operations may reduce tree survival and growth, but responses are soil-, species-, and disturbance-specific. We studied wet-weather harvesting, shearing, root-raking, disking, and phosphorus fertilization on a poorly drained flatwoods site in Louisiana. Slash pine survival was improved by wet-weather harvesting, but 18-year growth responses were not affected by any physical disturbances due to the inherently poor physical properties of soils on the site. Fertilization increased volume at age 18 by 47 percent, and the effect was still increasing.

  • Citation: Scott, D. Andrew; Tiarks, Allan E. 2006. Eighteen-year response of slash pine to wet-weather harvesting and site preparation on a poorly drained silt loam soil in Louisiana. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 185-190
  • Posted Date: June 16, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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