Stocktype and harvest gap size influence northern red oak regeneration success

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  • Authors: Jacobs, Douglass F.; Rathfon, Ron A.; Davis, Anthony S.; Carlson, Don E.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 247-250

Abstract

Four different northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) stocktypes (standard- or low-nursery-density bareroot seedlings and 11.4 or 18.9 L container seedlings) were outplanted into large-, medium-, and small-harvested gap openings (0.400, 0.024, and 0.100 ha, respectively) and closed-canopy control plots in southern Indiana. Two-year survival, height, and diameter were each lower in small gaps and control plots, but there were no differences between medium and large openings. Container seedlings had reduced survival compared to bareroot stock, which was attributed to root damage incurred during overwintering. Diameter growth of container seedlings was greater than that of bareroot stock, though height growth did not differ. Both initial and final height and diameter were greater for container than bareroot stock. Container stock in the two larger gap-opening treatments established a dominant, free-to-grow status. These results illustrate the potential suitability of certain gap opening sizes and stocktypes to promote oak regeneration after harvesting.

  • Citation: Jacobs, Douglass F.; Rathfon, Ron A.; Davis, Anthony S.; Carlson, Don E. 2006. Stocktype and harvest gap size influence northern red oak regeneration success. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 247-250
  • Posted Date: June 16, 2006
  • Modified Date: December 19, 2006
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