Effects of light acclimation on photosynthesis, growth, and biomass allocation in america chestnut seedlings

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  • Authors: Wang, G. Geoff; Bauerle, William L.; Mudder, Bryan T.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 261

Abstract

American chestnut [Castanea dentate(Marshall) Borkh.] was a widely distributed tree species in the Eastern U.S., comprising an estimated 25 percent of native eastern hardwood forests. Chestnut blight eradicated American chestnut from the forest canopy by the 1950s, and now it only persists as understory sprouts. However, blight-resistant hybrids with approximately 94 percent American chestnut genetic inheritance are scheduled to be available in 2007. Given the economic and ecological importance of the species prior to the blight, great interest and support for the reintroduction is expected. Successful reintroduction will ultimately depend on a viable silvicultural system. However, little is known about the silvics of American chestnut. The objective of this experiment was to investigate light acclimation of American chestnut seedlings growing under a wide range of light conditions.

  • Citation: Wang, G. Geoff; Bauerle, William L.; Mudder, Bryan T. 2006. Effects of light acclimation on photosynthesis, growth, and biomass allocation in america chestnut seedlings. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 261
  • Posted Date: June 16, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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