Initial response of underplanted yellow poplar and cherrybark oak seedlings to four levels of mechanical midstory removal

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  • Authors: Lhotka, John M.; Loewenstein, Edward F.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 275-278

Abstract

Midstory removal has been suggested as a possible enhancement strategy to develop seedling pools in stands lacking vigorous advanced oak (Quercus spp.) reproduction. However, for successful implementation, silviculturists must understand the differential growth responses of oak and its competitors to conditions created by midstory removal. To further quantify the competitive dynamics between cherrybark oak (Q. pagoda Raf.) and yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), this study was designed to assess the initial height growth responses of these species to four levels of midstory removal and to understory vegetation control. The study was installed within a riparian corridor located in western Georgia, and treatments were completed in the fall of 2003. One-year data suggests cherrybark oak height increment was not significantly increased by any level of midstory removal. In contrast, yellow-poplar growth was significantly greater in the removal treatments and was highest under full midstory removal. Results also show that the height growth of cherrybark oak was significantly higher and yellow-poplar was significantly lower within understory control treatment. Overall, data suggest that underplanted yellowpoplar may have initial height growth advantage over cherrybark oak following midstory removal.

  • Citation: Lhotka, John M.; Loewenstein, Edward F. 2006. Initial response of underplanted yellow poplar and cherrybark oak seedlings to four levels of mechanical midstory removal. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 275-278
  • Posted Date: June 16, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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