Adjusting slash pine growth and yield for silvicultural treatments

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  • Authors: Logan, Stephen R.; Shiver, Barry D.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 328-332

Abstract

With intensive silvicultural treatments such as fertilization and competition control now commonplace in today's slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) plantations, a method to adjust current growth and yield models is required to accurately account for yield increases due to these practices. Some commonly used ad-hoc methods, such as raising site index, have been found to inadequately account for yield responses seen in designed studies. Based on data from a Plantation Management Research Cooperative (PMRC) slash pine site preparation study, a PMRC slash pine improved planting stock – vegetation control study, and a PMRC slash pine mid-rotation release study, two model forms have been fit to account for fertilization, competition control, bedding, and mid-rotation release. These models are used to adjust current dominant height and basal area equations for the various treatments. The model forms, different treatment response patterns, and magnitude of each treatment response are presented.

  • Citation: Logan, Stephen R.; Shiver, Barry D. 2006. Adjusting slash pine growth and yield for silvicultural treatments. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 328-332
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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