Effect of rotation age and physiographic region on weight per cubic foot of planted loblolly pine

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  • Authors: Clark, Alexander III; Daniels, Richard F.; Borders, Bruce E.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 344-346

Abstract

Most harvested southern pine is sold by weight. We discuss how the weight of wood and bark per cubic foot of wood (the weight scaling factor) for plantation-grown loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) varies with tree age across the coastal and inland regions of the Southern United States. To determine the weight scaling factor for plantation trees in the Atlantic Coastal Plain, Gulf Coastal Plain, upper Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Hilly Coastal Plain, we destructively sampled > 1,200 loblolly trees 5 to 17 inches in diameter at breast height and 10 to 45 years old. We cut cross-sectional disks at 4- to 8-foot intervals up the stem and determined the green weight of wood and bark per cubic foot. We weighted disk values by basal area to obtain a stem-weighted scaling factor. Our results show that the weight scaling factor averaged 2 percent higher for loblolly pine planted in the coastal region than loblolly planted in the inland region. In both regions, the weight scaling factor decreased significantly with tree age. This variation shows that the factors should be adjusted to account for differences in tree age at the time of harvest.

  • Citation: Clark, Alexander, III; Daniels, Richard F.; Borders, Bruce E. 2006. Effect of rotation age and physiographic region on weight per cubic foot of planted loblolly pine. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 344-346
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: July 23, 2007
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