An economic comparison of slash and loblolly pine under various levels of management in the lower Atlantic and gulf coastal plain

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  • Authors: Dickens, E. David; Dangerfield, Coleman W. Jr.; Moorhead, David J.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 351-356

Abstract

Nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) landowners have perceived reduced product market availability and increased price uncertainty since late 1997 in the southeastern United States. Lower Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain NIPF landowners seek management options utilizing two commonly available pine species, loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and slash (Pinus elliottii Engelm.), to enhance feasibility, profitability, and cash-flow of production forestry enterprises. At the same time, NIPF landowners desire heightened flexibility across time required to achieve marketable forest products. This paper examines feasibility, profitability, and cash-flow of 24-year rotation management options affecting wood-flow for slash and loblolly pine plantations. Modeled treatments include thinning, fertilization, and pine straw harvests under alternative levels of productivity and current (2004) product prices. Calculated financial measures of profitability include net revenue and internal rate of return using the Georgia Pine Plantation Simulator (GaPPS 4.20) growth and yield model developed at The University of Georgia Warnell School of Forest Resources.

  • Citation: Dickens, E. David; Dangerfield, Coleman W., Jr.; Moorhead, David J. 2006. An economic comparison of slash and loblolly pine under various levels of management in the lower Atlantic and gulf coastal plain. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 351-356
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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