Inclusion of climatic variables in longleaf pine growth models

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  • Authors: Rayamajhi, Jyoti N.; Kush, John S.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 367-370

Abstract

The Regional Longleaf Growth Study was established by the USDA Forest Service to study the dynamics of naturally regenerated, even-aged longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) stands. The study accounts for growth change over time by adding new sets of plots in the youngest age class every 10 years. To detect possible changes in productivity with time, a series of timerep plots in youngest age class were established and periodically re-measured. Stand level and growth models were fitted to individual timerep data sets. Parameter stability analyses indicated that model parameters changed significantly from one time period to the next. Further tests identified particular parameters that were most sensitive to time and in need of modification. Climate variables were added as covariates to models to improve stability of modeling parameters, since climatic indices are correlated with residuals. There have been changes in productivity of these plots which may be related to changes in climate.

  • Citation: Rayamajhi, Jyoti N.; Kush, John S. 2006. Inclusion of climatic variables in longleaf pine growth models. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 367-370
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: November 12, 2020
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