Forecasting economic gains from intensive plantation management using unrealistic yield over input curves

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: South, David B.; VanderSchaaf, Curtis L.; Teeter, Larry D.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 379-384

Abstract

Some researchers claim that continuously increasing intensive plantation management will increase profits and reduce the unit cost of wood production while others believe in the law of diminishing returns. We developed four hypothetical production models where yield is a function of silvicultural effort. Models that produced unrealistic results were (1) an exponential curve and (2) a linear curve where the cost of growing a cubic foot of wood was inversely related to the discounted cost of intensive silviculture. Although increasing silvicultural effort will often result in producing more wood, the increase is sometimes not enough to prevent a reduction in net present value of the stand. Harvesting intensively managed stands at ages 14 to 16 years might not prove economical for a private, nonindustrial landowner if the costs of establishment are too high or if no local mills will purchase logs that contain a high percentage of juvenile wood.

  • Citation: South, David B.; VanderSchaaf, Curtis L.; Teeter, Larry D. 2006. Forecasting economic gains from intensive plantation management using unrealistic yield over input curves. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 379-384
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.