Dry creek long-term watershed study: buffer zone performance as viable amphibian habitat

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  • Authors: Talley, Brooke L.; Crisman, Thomas L.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 396-399

Abstract

As bioindicators, amphibians typically require both terrestrial and aquatic habitats to complete their life cycles. Pre- timber-harvest monitoring (December 2002 through September 2003) of salamander and frog (Hylidae) populations was conducted in four watersheds of Decatur County, GA. Post- timber-harvest monitoring (December 2003 through September 2004) continued in the same watersheds (two reference and two treatment watersheds). Coverboards were used to monitor adult salamanders, larval salamanders were surveyed with dipnet sweeps, and frogs were monitored with vertical PVC pipes. Six salamander species (Desmognathus apalachicolae, Eurycea cirrigera, E. guttolineata, Notophthalmus viridescens, Plethodon grobmani, and Pseudotriton ruber) and five frog species (Hyla chyrsoscelis, H. cinerea, H. femoralis, H. squirella, and Pseudacris crucifer) were recorded. Pre- and post-harvest data were compared to assess changes in amphibian population structure. Larval salamanders were the only amphibian group to decline 1 year after timber-harvest. Further long-term examination of amphibian populations should be continued to assess potential delayed responses to site disturbance.

  • Citation: Talley, Brooke L.; Crisman, Thomas L. 2006. Dry creek long-term watershed study: buffer zone performance as viable amphibian habitat. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 396-399
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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