Soil erosion from harvested sites versus streamside management zone sediment deposition in the Piedmont of Virginia

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Lakel, William A. III; Aust, W. Michael; Dolloff, C. Andrew; Easterbrook, Amy W.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 400-401

Abstract

Forestry best management practices were primarily developed to address two major issues related to soil erosion: water quality and site productivity. Sixteen watersheds managed as loblolly pine plantations in the piedmont region were monitored for soil erosion and water quality prior to treatment. Subsequently, all watersheds were harvested with clearcutting, ground-based skidding, prescribed burning, and installation of fire lines. Four blocks were established on the basis of geology, soils, topography, vegetation, and management. Within each block, 5 SMZ treatments (25-feet-wide, 50-feet-wide with and without partial harvest, and 100-feet-wide with and without partial harvest) were installed. On-site erosion was estimated for the watershed and within each major disturbance category (harvest, skid trails, fire lines) and contrasted with the quantity of sediment trapped by the various SMZ treatments.

  • Citation: Lakel, William A., III; Aust, W. Michael; Dolloff, C. Andrew; Easterbrook, Amy W. 2006. Soil erosion from harvested sites versus streamside management zone sediment deposition in the Piedmont of Virginia. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 400-401
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.