Geographic origin of cottonwood from the southeast affects Melampsora infection in 3-year-old clonal trials

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Land, Samuel B. Jr.; Jeffreys, Jonathan Paul
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 431-437

Abstract

Open-pollinated seeds were collected separately by mother tree from several trees in each of 64 natural stands of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides J. Bartram ex Marsh. var. deltoides) in the Southeastern United States. Rooted cuttings from the seedlings were grown at four sites (North Carolina, Florida, Alabama, and Missouri). Measurements were taken during September-October in each of the first 3 years after planting for Melampsora medusae Thuem. f.sp. deltoidae leaf rust infection. Average severity of infection over the 3 years varied with latitude and longitude of the stand where the seeds were collected, with subregion of origin, and with individual stand of origin within subregion. However, differences among riversystem groups or topographic positions (upland or bottomland) for stand origins within subregions were not significant. Some of the natural stands were comparable in resistance (less infection) to a set of 12 “check” clones in the trials that came from former tree improvement programs in the lower Mississippi River Valley and Texas.

  • Citation: Land, Samuel B., Jr.; Jeffreys, Jonathan Paul. 2006. Geographic origin of cottonwood from the southeast affects Melampsora infection in 3-year-old clonal trials. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 431-437
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.