Performance of mixed pine-hardwood stands 16 years after fell-and-burn treatments

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  • Authors: Blizzard, Elizabeth M.; van Lear, David H.; Wang, G. Geoff; Waldrop, Thomas A.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 499-501

Abstract

Four variations of the fell-and-burn technique were compared for height and volume production on dry Piedmont sites. A two-factorial randomized complete block design of winter versus spring felling, with and without a summer burn, was implemented, followed by planting of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) at 15 x 15 foot spacing. After 16 growing seasons, the winter fell with summer burn treatment resulted in greater planted pine volume (1,087.1 ± 72.8 cubic feet per acre) than either unburned treatment (652.4 ± 89.2 cubic feet per acre). The winter fell with no burn treatment resulted in greater oak volume (373.5 ± 71.3 cubic feet per acre) than did either burn treatment (108.7 ± 58.3 cubic feet per acre). Modifications of the fell-and-burn treatment can be used to alter the dominance of pine or hardwood components in developing mixed pine-hardwood stands. Stands should be monitored for further effects of canopy closure, self-thinning, and growth of oaks into micro-canopy gaps.

  • Citation: Blizzard, Elizabeth M.; van Lear, David H.; Wang, G. Geoff; Waldrop, Thomas A. 2006. Performance of mixed pine-hardwood stands 16 years after fell-and-burn treatments. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 499-501
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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