Using group selection to regenerate oaks in Northern Arkansas

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Heitzman, Eric; Stephens, John
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 547-550

Abstract

We examined the regeneration dynamics within group selection openings in 12 mature oak-hickory forests in the Ozark Mountains of northern Arkansas. Plots were established in openings harvested in 1991, 1994, 1995, and 1998. Seventy seven percent of the openings were < 0.4 acre, which is the frequently reported minimum opening size for successfully regenerating oaks. Openings were dominated by black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.), blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), and flowering dogwood (Cornus florida L.). White oak (Quercus alba L.) and red oak (Q. rubra L. and Q. velutina Lam.) density varied widely among study sites but averaged 9 percent. Most oaks were in a free-togrow position. No oaks were recorded in about one-third of the openings. The future species composition of the openings will probably be more diverse than that of the unharvested portions of the forests studied.

  • Citation: Heitzman, Eric; Stephens, John. 2006. Using group selection to regenerate oaks in Northern Arkansas. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 547-550
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.