Species-site relationships in a Northern Arkansas upland forest

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  • Authors: Heitzman, Eric; Shelton, Michael G.; Chapman, Ruth Ann
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 570-573

Abstract

Phytosociological aspects of the forest vegetation were described for a 780-ha area on the Sylamore Experimental Forest in northern Arkansas. Pronounced changes in species composition occurred with topographic position in this deeply dissected area. For the overstory, oaks and pines dominated the upper slope positions, while other tree species dominated the lower slopes and hollows. However, other tree species dominated the understory and reproduction strata of all topographic positions. Species diversity was highest in the hollows and declined going upslope for the overstory and understory, but diversity was lowest in the hollows for reproduction, which probably reflected the dominance of several shrub species. Some variation in species composition could also be attributed to aspect. The described gradients in species composition have implications for the silvicultural ease of obtaining reproduction of targeted species within the area.

  • Citation: Heitzman, Eric; Shelton, Michael G.; Chapman, Ruth Ann. 2006. Species-site relationships in a Northern Arkansas upland forest. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 570-573
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: November 12, 2020
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