The response of two very young naturally regenerated upland hardwood stands to weed control and fertilization

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Schuler, Jamie L.; Robison, Daniel J.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 615-619

Abstract

Two newly regenerated hardwood forest stands in the Piedmont of North Carolina were examined to determine the potential to accelerate productivity in young stands. Factorial combinations of fertilization and vegetation control treatments were applied to 1-year-old and 3-year-old stands. After three growing seasons, fertilization improved growth rates at both sites. The collective species response to NPK fertilization was a doubling of individual seedling volume. Weeding failed to significantly increase growth over nonweeded seedlings, and the combined weeding and fertilization effects were additive (no interaction). Stem densities declined markedly after 3 years. Mortality at the lower end of the initial height distribution was increased on the fertilize-only plots, suggesting that the substantial increase in height in the fertilization treatment was not completely attributable to enhanced growth rates alone. These results highlight that young stands may not be performing up to their potential, and that early stand intervention can be a viable management strategy.

  • Citation: Schuler, Jamie L.; Robison, Daniel J. 2006. The response of two very young naturally regenerated upland hardwood stands to weed control and fertilization. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 615-619
  • Posted Date: June 17, 2006
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.