Long-term longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantation studies on the palustris experimental forest: growing timber to provide habitat

  • Authors: Goelz, J.C.G.; Barnett, J.P.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Long-term silvicultural & ecological studies: results for science and management: 163-168

Abstract

In 1935 the 7,500 acre palustris experimental forest was ordained by Congress to provide an area for conducting forestry research. However, work was already underway to establish research studies before the area was officially designated as an experimental forest within the boundaries of the Kistachie National Forest. At the time, much of the region consisted of cutover pine lands that had been habitually burned by humans, grazed by domestic livestock, and subject to large populations of free-roaming feral hogs. These conditions hindered any sort of forest regeneration. "Stump orchards" were a term often used to describe what appeared as a grassland punctuated by remnants of the stumps of the old pines. The hogs could be particularly devastating to young longleaf pine seedlings whose roots they prized.

  • Citation: Goelz, J.C.G.; Barnett, J.P. 2006. Long-term longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantation studies on the palustris experimental forest: growing timber to provide habitat. In: Long-term silvicultural & ecological studies: results for science and management: 163-168
  • Posted Date: December 15, 2006
  • Modified Date: December 18, 2006
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