Predicting the cover-up of dead branches using a simple single regressor equation

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  • Authors: Oswalt, Christopher M.; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Burkhardt, E.C.
  • Publication Year: 2007
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–101. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 77-85 [CD-ROM].

Abstract

Information on the effects of branch diameter on branch occlusion is necessary for building models capable of forecasting the effect of management decisions on tree or log grade. We investigated the relationship between branch size and subsequent branch occlusion through diameter growth with special attention toward the development of a simple single regressor equation for use in future hardwood stem quality models. Data were obtained from 21 boards representing 3 logs of the first 21 feet of one cherrybark oak originating from a planted stand north of Vicksburg, MS. Double cross-validation methods were used to evaluate fitted models. A non-linear model form (Y = a*BKmax b, where Y = overwood, BKmax = maximum branch-knot diameter and a and b are parameters) provided the best fit. The model explained approximately 50 percent of the variation in overwood.

  • Citation: Oswalt, Christopher M.; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Burkhardt, E.C. 2007. Predicting the cover-up of dead branches using a simple single regressor equation. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–101. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 77-85 [CD-ROM].
  • Posted Date: July 19, 2007
  • Modified Date: January 8, 2008
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