Environmental globalization, organizational form, and expected benefits from protected areas in Central America

  • Authors: Pfeffer, Max J.; Schelhas, John W.; Meola, Catherine
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Rural Sociology, Vol. 71(3): 429-450

Abstract

Environmental globalization has led to the implementation of conservation efforts like the creation of protected areas that often promote the interests of core countries in poorer regions. The creation of protected areas in poor areas frequently creates tensions between human needs like - food and shelter and environmental conservation. Support for such conservation efforts partially depends on expectations of benefits by those impacted. This article considers the effects of different organizational models on local expectations of benefits to be derived from protected areas. Our analysis indicates that individuals are more likely to expect that benefits of the park go to other communities or the nation as a whole than to expect direct benefits fbr themselves. Forms of park organization also impact these expectations. Individuals exposed to the zoned park, as opposed to a conventional, strictly protected park, were more likely to expect benefits from the park regardless of the beneficiary considered. In addition, for those exposed to the zoned park, location of residence is related to expectation that individuals will benefit themselves. However, our interviews with park residents also indicate that the expectations of individual benefits are rarely met, creating potential dissatisfaction and sometimes animosity toward the park administration.

  • Citation: Pfeffer, Max J.; Schelhas, John W.; Meola, Catherine 2006. Environmental globalization, organizational form, and expected benefits from protected areas in Central America. Rural Sociology, Vol. 71(3): 429-450
  • Posted Date: November 27, 2007
  • Modified Date: November 27, 2007
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