Thermomechanical pulp fiber surface modification for enhancing the interfacial adhesion with polypropylene

  • Authors: Lee, Sangyeob; Shupe, Todd F.; Groom, Leslie H.; Hse, Chung Y.
  • Publication Year: 2007
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Wood and Fiber Science, Vol. 39(3): 424-433

Abstract

Chemical coupling on the thermomechanical pulp (TMP) fiber improved tensile strength of the TMP fiber handsheet and isotactic polypropylene film laminates (TPL). For the maleic anhydride W) with benzoyl peroxide (BPO)a an initiator, tensile strength increaded 52: with the TMP fiber treatment over untreated laminates. The optimum strength properties were obtained with an MA and BPO ratio of 2:1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM )images also showed the effectiveness of MA loading on the surface of TMP fibers due tb increased fiber failure without fiber pullout hm the polypropylene matrixes. Crystallinity and heat flow from DSC, as expected, decreased with the addition of MA on the TMP fiber surface. These results were also in accordance with the morphological observations at the fractures.surface, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra, and thermal analysis. Based on the high correlation between tensile strength and the number of fibers counted at the point of failures, the number of fibers proved to be a sensitive m& of the effectiveness of surface treatment.

  • Citation: Lee, Sangyeob; Shupe, Todd F.; Groom, Leslie H.; Hse, Chung Y. 2007. Thermomechanical pulp fiber surface modification for enhancing the interfacial adhesion with polypropylene. Wood and Fiber Science, Vol. 39(3): 424-433
  • Posted Date: December 4, 2007
  • Modified Date: December 4, 2007
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