Mechanical properties of small-scale laminated wood composite poles: effects of taper and webs

  • Authors: Piao, Cheng; Shupe, Todd F.; Tang, R.C.; Hse, Chung Y.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Wood and Fiber Science, Vol. 38(4): 633-643

Abstract

Laminated hollow wood composite poles represent an efficient utilization of the timber resource and a promising alternative for solid poles that are commonly used in the power transmission and telecommunication lines. The objective of this study was to improve the performance of composite poles by introducing the bio-mimicry concept into the design of hollow wood composite poles. Five laminated hollow wood composite poles with taper and plywood-made webs, acting like the nodes in the bamboo, were made and tested in cantilevered static bending. Results indicated that node-like webs had a positive effect on the integrity, static bending properties, and shear resistance of the members tested, and their strength performance is comparable to that of the solid wood composite poles. However, the laminated hollow wood composite poles with taper showed slightly lower resistance to horizontal shear as compared to the members without taper.

  • Citation: Piao, Cheng; Shupe, Todd F.; Tang, R.C.; Hse, Chung Y. 2006. Mechanical properties of small-scale laminated wood composite poles: effects of taper and webs. Wood and Fiber Science, Vol. 38(4): 633-643
  • Keywords: Cantilevered static bending, mechanical properties, taper, wood poles
  • Posted Date: December 4, 2007
  • Modified Date: December 4, 2007
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