Linking sudden oak death with spatial economic value transfer

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Holmes, Tom; Smith, Bill
  • Publication Year: 2008
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 289-298

Abstract

Sudden oak death (caused by Phytophthora ramorum) is currently having a dramatic impact on the flow of ecosystem services provided by trees and forests in California. Timber species in California are not thought to be at risk of mortality from this pathogen and, consequently, economic impacts accrue to non-market values of trees such as aesthetics, shading, and the knowledge that healthy forest ecosystems exist. Because non-market valuation studies are expensive to design and implement, we propose that spatial benefit transfer methods can be used as a pragmatic means for obtaining second-best estimates of the economic damages associated with P. ramorum. Economic damages to residential property values and public forest land are identified as a major concern.

  • Citation: Holmes, Tom; Smith, Bill 2008. Linking sudden oak death with spatial economic value transfer. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 289-298
  • Keywords: Economic impacts, non-market values, value transfer, hedonic property value, contingent valuation, existence value, GIS
  • Posted Date: May 19, 2008
  • Modified Date: October 28, 2008
  • Requesting Print Publications

    Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

    Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.