The Effect of Herbivory by White-Tailed Deer and Additionally Swamp Rabbits in an Old-Growth Bottomland Hardwood Forest

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Devall, Margaret S.; Parresol, Bernard R.; Smith, Winston P.
  • Publication Year: 2001
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS 42. Asheville, NC: U.S.Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 49-64

Abstract

Forest openings create internal patchiness and offer different habitat qualities that attract wildlife, especially herbivores, that flourish along forest edges. But intense herbivory in these openings can reduce or eliminate herbaceous and woody species and thus influence local species composition and structure of the forest. This study in an old-growth bottomland hardwood forest in southeastern Arkansas compares plant colonization among experimental plots, which excluded white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), deer and swamp rabbits (Sylvilagus aquaticus), and control plots. After the third year, plant species composition and abundance were significantly affected by herbivores.

  • Citation: Devall, Margaret S.; Parresol, Bernard R.; Smith, Winston P. 2001. The Effect of Herbivory by White-Tailed Deer and Additionally Swamp Rabbits in an Old-Growth Bottomland Hardwood Forest. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS 42. Asheville, NC: U.S.Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 49-64
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Requesting Print Publications

    Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

    Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.