A Long-Term View of Old-Growth Deciduous Forests

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  • Authors: Tanner, James T.; Hamel, Paul B.
  • Publication Year: 2001
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS 42. Asheville, NC: U.S.Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 106-109

Abstract

Lowland old-growth forests in the Southeastern United States and Eastern Europe (Poland) survived because of accidents of history, topography, and ownership until they came under governmental protection. Such old-growth stands are the similar the world over; they have trees of many ages, patchy distribution of habitats, and a variety of microhabitats, all of which result from the death and fall of trees. Species diversity is high for both plants and animals. Old-growth forests constitute important habitat for many carnivores and for some endangered species; they are places for ecological research and for recreation and enjoyment. Science has shown that management, as well as protection, is necessary and can improve conditions.

  • Citation: Tanner, James T.; Hamel, Paul B. 2001. A Long-Term View of Old-Growth Deciduous Forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS 42. Asheville, NC: U.S.Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 106-109
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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