Water and Nutrient Effects on Loblolly Pine Production and Stand Development on a Sandhill Site

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  • Authors: Allen, H.L.; Albaugh, T. J.; Johnsen, Kurt H.
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 594-595

Abstract

During the last decade, it has become apparent that production rates of pine plantations in the southeastern United States are far below levels that are biologically and economically optimal. By managing genetic and site resource effectively, production rates should exceed 350 ft3/ acre/year on most sites. In effort to better understand the ecophysiological constraints to production, the SETRES study was established in 1992 on a well-drained loamy sand site in Scotland County, NC. The experimental study consists of two levels of irrigation (none and optimum) and two levels of nutrient amendment (none and annual additions) replicated four times. Treatment plots measure 50 x 50 m with the internal 30 x 30 m as a measurement plot. Details of the experimental design, treatment regimes, and measurements are provided in Albaugh et al. 1998. Over the eight-year period since treatments were imposed, detailed assessments of individual tree and stand physiological, growth and development process have been examined.

  • Citation: Allen, H.L.; Albaugh, T. J.; Johnsen, Kurt H. 2002. Water and Nutrient Effects on Loblolly Pine Production and Stand Development on a Sandhill Site. In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 594-595
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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