Ectomycorrihizae of Table Mountain Pine and the Influence of Prescribed Burning on their Survival

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  • Authors: Ellis, Lisa E.; Waldrop, Thomas A.; Tainter, Frank H.
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 128-131

Abstract

High-intensity prescribed fires have been recommended to regenerate Table Mountain pine (Pinus pungens). However, tests of these burns produced few seedlings, possibly due to soil sterilization. This study examined abundance of mycorrhizal root tips in the field after a high-intensity fire and in the laboratory after exposing rooting media to various temperatures. One- and two-year old seedlings in the field had abundant mycorrhizal root tips formed by symbiotic relationships with at least three fungal species. Laboratory tests showed reduced mycorrhizal root tip formation only after prolonged exposure to very high temperatures. This study suggests that poor regeneration after high-intensity prescribed fires was not caused by a lack of mycorrhizal fungi.

  • Citation: Ellis, Lisa E.; Waldrop, Thomas A.; Tainter, Frank H. 2002. Ectomycorrihizae of Table Mountain Pine and the Influence of Prescribed Burning on their Survival. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 128-131
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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