Evaluation of the diagnostic feasibility of the electronic nose in detecting incipient decay of artificially inoculated wood

  • Authors: Baietto, Manuela; Wilson, A. Dan; Bassi, Daniele; Ferrini, Francesco
  • Publication Year: 2008
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of the European Congress of Arboriculture, Arboriculture for the Third Millennium, International Society of Arboriculture, Turin, Italy. 5 p.(Paper published on CD-ROM only, not in a journal).

Abstract

The tree stability-assessment methodology currently used in Italian cities initially follows a visual analysis of individual trees, followed by an evaluation of the internal state using different instruments that are often invasive, expensive, or cannot be effectively used in the urban environment. Moreover, many of these instruments do not provide an adequate evaluation of decay that occurs in the root system

The aim of this research was to evaluate the possibility of integrating tools currently used for assessments of tree decay in the urban environment with innovative techniques used in other fields and industries for various applications, such as quality control, environmental monitoring, medical diagnoses, and perfumery. The electronic nose (e-nose) was tested for its capability of detecting volatiles released by wood decay fungi, healthy trees, and diseased trees. Two different types of e-noses, based on different technologies, also were compared to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient decays in artificially-inoculated wood with very high levels of precision and confidence. The e-nose utilizing polypyrrole-coated quartz microbalances with acoustic wave sensor array provided better results than the other technology (metal-oxide gas sensors) in discriminating woody samples containing different agents of wood decay.

  • Citation: Baietto, Manuela; Wilson, A. Dan; Bassi, Daniele; Ferrini, Francesco 2008. Evaluation of the diagnostic feasibility of the electronic nose in detecting incipient decay of artificially inoculated wood. In: Proceedings of the European Congress of Arboriculture, Arboriculture for the Third Millennium, International Society of Arboriculture, Turin, Italy. 5 p.(Paper published on CD-ROM only, not in a journal).
  • Keywords: sensory systems, rot, wood, destroying fungi, urban ornamental species
  • Posted Date: October 31, 2008
  • Modified Date: October 31, 2008
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.