Trends in nursery research and production

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  • Authors: Barnett, James P.
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
  • Source: In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E.; Landis, T. D., technical coordinators. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-24. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 97-100

Abstract

Forest nursery production is at an all-time high in the southern United States, and to maintain and increase this production capacity we need to integrate research and operational technology. Me must improve the technology to increase production of container southern pine seedlings, especially for longleaf pine. Bareroot nursery managers have challenges to maintain the current level of nursery productivity and to increase the production of hardwoods for wetland restoration and nontraditional species such as wire grass for longleaf pine restoration. Finding alternatives for methyl bromide causes uncertainty in the operation of many bareroot nurseries where the loss of this chemical may cause significant disease and weed problems.

  • Citation: Barnett, James P. 2002. Trends in nursery research and production. In: Dumroese, R. K.; Riley, L. E.; Landis, T. D., technical coordinators. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-24. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 97-100
  • Keywords: seed treatments, seed predation, pesticides, longleaf pine, tree planting
  • Posted Date: November 5, 2008
  • Modified Date: April 9, 2009
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