Searching for American chestnut: the estimation of rare species attributes in a national forest inventory

  • Authors: Roesch, Francis A.; McWilliams, William H.
  • Publication Year: 2005
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: 2005 Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium: 115-121

Abstract

American chestnut, once a dominant tree species in forests of the Northeastern United States, has become extremely rare. It is so rare, in fact, that on completion of 80 percent of the plot measurements of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service's most recent inventory in Pennsylvania, only 33 American chestnut trees with a diameter at breast height 2: 1.0 in were found, out of 72,416 sampled trees. This paper discusses auxiliary sampling strategies that allow Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) units to estimate rare species in general as a first step in considering the especially difficult problems that American chestnut poses. The strategies involve (l) an increase of the initial plot size, (2) the use of adaptive cluster samping, and (3) a combination of the first two. Adaptive cluster sampling was developed for the estimation of rare clustered events and is considered here because American chestnut is not only rare but also known to occur almost exclusively in clusters.

  • Citation: Roesch, Francis A.; McWilliams, William H. 2005. Searching for American chestnut: the estimation of rare species attributes in a national forest inventory. In: 2005 Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium: 115-121
  • Posted Date: December 12, 2008
  • Modified Date: December 22, 2008
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.