Ecology and silviculture of poplar plantations

  • Authors: Stanturf, John A.; van Oosten, Cees; Netzer, Daniel A.; Coleman, Mark D.; Portwood, C. Jeffrey
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: D.I.; Isebrands, J.G.; Eckenwalder, J.E.; Richardson, J., eds. Poplar culture in North America, part A, chapter 5. Ottawa: NRC Research Press, National Research Council of Canada: 153-206

Abstract

Poplars are some of the fastest growing trees in North America and foresters have sought to capitalize on this potential since the 1940s. Interest in growing poplars has fluctuated, and objectives have shifted between producing sawlogs, pulp-wood, or more densely spaced "woodgrass" or biofuels. Currently, most poplar plantations are established for pulpwood or chip production on rotations of 10 years or less, but interest in sawlog production is increasing. Sid McKnight characterized cottonwood as a prima donna species: under ideal condi-tions, growth rates are just short of spectacular. Just as this can be applied to all poplars, it is equally true that all poplars are demanding of good sites and careful establishment. Growing poplars in plantations is challenging, and good establish-ment the first year is critical to long-term success. If a grower lacks the commit-ment or resources to provide needed treatments at critical times, then species other than poplars should be considered. Our objective in this chapter is to provide growers with current information for establishing and tending poplar plantations, as practiced in North America. Where we have sufficient information, differences between the poplar-growing regions of the United States and Canada will be noted. Mostly information is available on eastern and black cottonwood and their hybrids.

  • Citation: Stanturf, John A.; van Oosten, Cees; Netzer, Daniel A.; Coleman, Mark D.; Portwood, C. Jeffrey 2002. Ecology and silviculture of poplar plantations. D.I.; Isebrands, J.G.; Eckenwalder, J.E.; Richardson, J., eds. Poplar culture in North America, part A, chapter 5. Ottawa: NRC Research Press, National Research Council of Canada: 153-206
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: April 26, 2007
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