A southern region conference on technology transfer and extension

This article contains other documents. View all titles contained within this article here.

  • Authors: Ashton, Sarah F.; Hubbard, William G.; Rauscher, H. Michael
  • Publication Year: 2009
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-116 Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 237 p.

Abstract

Forest landowners and managers have different education and technology transfer needs and preferences. To be effective it is important to use a multi-faceted science delivery/technology transfer program to reach them. Multi-faceted science delivery programs can provide similar content over a wide range of mechanisms including printed publications, face-to-face workshops and training sessions, satellite-based and pod casting-based distributed learning courses, and a wide range of Internet-based products. Several opportunities exist to share theories, products, activities, successes and failures across the science delivery, Extension and education communities. These proceedings from the Southern Region Conference on Technology Transfer and Extension in Natural Resources contain 4 keynote papers, 18 papers on various technical and procedural aspects of science delivery, and 9 papers describing various technology transfer efforts. As a collection, these papers describe the state of activities and thinking in Southern United States natural resource science delivery and technology transfer.

  • Citation: Ashton, Sarah F.; Hubbard, William G.; Rauscher, H. Michael 2009. A southern region conference on technology transfer and extension. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–116 Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 237 p.
  • Keywords: extension, forestry, technology, transfer
  • Posted Date: June 23, 2009
  • Modified Date: March 23, 2010
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.