Influence of whole-tree harvesting on stand composition and structure in the oak-pine type

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  • Authors: McMinn, James W.
  • Publication Year: 1989
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SE-58. Asheville, SC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station: 96-99.

Abstract

Oak-pine stands in the Upper Piedmont of Georgia were harvested with small fellerbunchers in both the dormant season and early growing season to 1 -inch and 4-inch lower diameter limits. After 9 years of natural stand development, both season and intensity of harvesting significantly influenced species composition and stand structure. Areas harvested during the growing season developed into essentially hardwood stands, while dormant-season harvests produced a substantial pine component, On the 4-inch-limit areas, competition to regeneration from the harvest residuals was still apparent.

  • Citation: McMinn, James W. 1989. Influence of whole-tree harvesting on stand composition and structure in the oak-pine type. In: Waldrop, Thomas A., ed. Proceedings of pine-hardwood mixtures: a symposium on management and ecology of the type. Gen. Tech. Rep. SE-58. Asheville, SC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station: 96-99.
  • Posted Date: August 5, 2009
  • Modified Date: August 5, 2009
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