San Dimas Experimental Forest, California—a giant outdoor hydrologic lab

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  • Authors: Wohlgemuth, Pete
  • Publication Year: 2009
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Wells, G. Experimental Forests and Ranges--100 Years of Research Success Stories. Gen. Tech. Rep. FPL-GTR-182, Madison, WI: Forest Products Laboratory, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 20-21.

Abstract

A visitor to the San Dimas Experimental Forest might be forgiven for wondering where the trees are. It’s not that San Dimas doesn’t have trees; the native chaparral that furs the canyonsides has a lot of scrub oak—technically a tree—amid chamise, ceanothus, and toyon. Moister riparian grottos support laurel, sycamore, and alder. And clinging to the edges of roads are a few specimens of incense-cedar and Coulter pine, exotics brought in by early foresters.

  • Citation: Wohlgemuth, P. M. 2009. San Dimas Experimental Forest, California—a giant outdoor hydrologic lab. In: Wells, G. Experimental Forests and Ranges--100 Years of Research Success Stories. Gen. Tech. Rep. FPL-GTR-182, Madison, WI: Forest Products Laboratory, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 20-21.
  • Posted Date: September 15, 2009
  • Modified Date: November 2, 2009
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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
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